Dataset: Generations and Gender Survey Netherlands Wave 1 & Wave 2

Abstract

The Generations and Gender Survey (GGS) provides micro-level data with the aim of significantly improving the knowledge base for social science and policymaking in Europe and developed countries elsewhere.  
In Europe 2020, the European Union develops a strategy "to help us come out stronger from the crisis and turn the EU into a smart, sustainable and inclusive economy delivering high levels of employment, productivity and social cohesion". The economic crisis affects not only day-to-day decisions, but also fundamental choices at all stages of people's lives:  marriage and childbearing, the combination of employment and caring responsibilities for the young and the old, retirement, housing, and ageing well. The GGS has been developed to provide scientists with high-quality data to contribute scientifically grounded answers to these key policy questions. Survey content focuses on intergenerational and gender relations between people, expressed in care arrangements and the organization of paid and unpaid work. Key feature of the survey are:  
- Cross-national comparability. In each country data is collected on the basis of a common international questionnaire and guidelines about the methodology. Data processing includes central harmonization of national datasets.  
- A broad age range. It includes respondents between the ages of 18 and 80.
- A longitudinal design. It has a panel design, collecting information on the same persons at three-year intervals.  
- A large sample size. It has an average of 9,000 respondents per country at Wave 1.
- A theory-driven and multidisciplinary questionnaire. It provides data for policy relevant research by demographers, economists, sociologists, social policy researchers, social psychologists and epidemiologists. The questionnaire is inspired by the theory of planned behavior.
- Possibility to combine the survey data with macro data provided by the GGP Contextual Database. This combination enables analyses of individuals and families in their cultural, economic, political, social and policy contexts.

Variable Groups

Document Description

Full Title

Generations and Gender Survey Netherlands Wave 1 & Wave 2

Alternative Title

GGS Netherlands Wave 1 & Wave 2

Identification Number

GGS.W1.W.2.18

Date of Distribution

2010-03-25

Version

Working Version: GGS Wave 1 Version 4.3 and GGS Wave 2 Version 1.3.

Update of variable catagories and documentation with the release of Poland Wave 2 Version 1.3.

Date: 2018-02-26

Guide To Codebook

In the field “Study Description”, users can find metadata about surveys. This includes the distributors, keywords, abstract, and guidelines on the bibliographic citation.  
Country specific metadata include information on survey producers, methodology and processing. This information was provided by the GGP-country teams, based on a metadata grid with pre-structured questions. Links to relevant references (e.g., working papers and questionnaires) are also provided.  

The field “Data Files Description” provides metadata about the data file, such as file contents, missing values, as well as changes across different GGS versions.

The field "Variable Description" provides information on each variable, such as question text, descriptions of country specific categories and variables, universe (i.e., subset of respondents to whom the question was asked), country specific deviations to GGS routing, descriptions of the ways in which consolidated and derived variables are calculated. Variables are ordered according to the sections of the GGS codebook.

PLEASE NOTICE THAT WE DOCUMENT ONLY VARIABLES HAVING VALID CASES.  
VARIABLES HAVING ALL SYSTEM MISSING CASES ARE NOT DOCUMENTED.  
This is the reason why the total no. of variables in the documentation is smaller than the total number of variables in the SPSS and STATA files.

Full Title

GGS_W1-V.4.3.&W2-V.1.3_Netherlands

Producer

Name Affiliation Abbreviation Role
Arianna Caporali Institut national d'études démographiques (INED) AC

Study Description

Full Title

Generations and Gender Survey Netherlands Wave 1 & Wave 2

Alternative Title

GGS Netherlands Wave 1 & Wave 2

Parallel Title

Netherlands Kinship Panel Study (NKPS) - A Multi-Actor, Multi-Method Panel Study on Solidarity in Family Relationships

Identification Number

GGS.W1.W2.18

Authoring Entity

Name Affiliation
Pearl A. Dykstra Erasmus University
Matthijs Kalmijn Tilburg University
Aart Liefbroer Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute
Aafke Komte Utrecht University
Trudie Knijn Utrecht University
Clara Mulde University of Groningen (during Wave 1)

Other identifications and acknowledgments

Name Affiliation Role
Sylvia Commandeur Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute (NIDI) Fieldwork coordination
Niels Schenk NIDI Fieldwork coordination
Eva-Maria Merz NIDI Scientist
Mathieu Starink NIDI Automations specialist
Renske Keizer NIDI Fieldwork assitance + preparation of data files
Anne van Putten NIDI Fieldwork assitance + preparation of data files
Freek Bucx Utrecht University Fieldwork assitance + preparation of data files
Willem Huijnk Utrecht University Fieldwork assitance + preparation of data files
Arieke Rijken Utrecht University Fieldwork assitance + preparation of data files
Marjolein Blaauboer University of Amsterdam (UvA) Fieldwork assitance + preparation of data files
Edith de Meester UvA Fieldwork assitance + preparation of data files
Francesca Michielin UvA Fieldwork assitance + preparation of data files
Annika Smits UvA Fieldwork assitance + preparation of data files
Joris Brekelmans Tilburg University Fieldwork assitance + preparation of data files
Jannes de Vries Tilburg University Fieldwork assitance + preparation of data files
Teun Geurts VU Amsterdam Fieldwork assitance + preparation of data files
Katrin Schwanitz EUR Fieldwork assitance + preparation of data files
Martijn Hogerbrugge NIDI Fieldwork assistance
Suzanna Rechtuijt UvA Fieldwork assistance
Vanessa Hage NIDI Financial accounting
Hans Uytenhout NIDI Financial accounting
Tonny Nieuwstraten NIDI Secretarial support
Jacqueline van der Helm NIDI Secretarial support
Jenny Gierveld NIDI Groundwork + Member NKPS Scientific Advisory Council
Liesbeth Dufornee Growth for Knowledge Panel Services (GfK PS) Fieldwork
Frans Louwen GfK PS Fieldwork
Peter Willems GfK PS Fieldwork
Stephan Santegoeds GfK PS Fieldwork
Sandra Emos Dufec Fieldwork migrant sample
Haluk Arslan ERC-Research Fieldwork migrant sample
Melanie van Haaren Graphic design
Gijs Zuijderduijn ANDO Printing
Egidio Tambani ANDO Printing
Mark Leijdekker Cendris Address sample
Liesbeth Niemans Cendris Data entry
Carl Bosboom jr Bosboom Mailing, handling
Hendrik Latuheru Bosboom Handling
Henk Bours Texpertise Turkish + Arabic translation
Willemien Kneppelhout English translation
Gijsbert Brunt Höcker Rueb Doeleman Advocaten Legal advice

Producer

Name Affiliation Abbreviation Role
Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute NIDI Project Coordination (WAVE1)
Netherlands Kinship Panel Study Secretariat Secretariat (WAVE 2)

Funding Agency/Sponsor

Name Abbreviation Role Grant
Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research NWO WAVE 1 (Major Investments Funds) 175.107.000.00 and 175.107.204.03
Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research NWO WAVE 2 (Major Investments Funds) 175.107.000.00 and 175.107.204.03
Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences KNAW WAVE 1
Utrecht University UU WAVE 1 and WAVE 2
Tilburg University TU WAVE 1 and WAVE 2
University of Amsterdam UvA WAVE 1 and WAVE 2
Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute NIDI WAVE 1 and WAVE 2

Data Distributor

Name Affiliation Abbreviation
Institut national des études démographiques - 133 boulevard Davout 75980 Paris Cedex 20, France. INED
Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute - Lange Houtstraat 19, NL-2511 CV The Hague, The Netherlands NIDI

Depositor

Name Affiliation Abbreviation
Pearl Dykstra Erasmus University

Bibliographic Citation

United Nations 2005. Generations & Gender Programme: Survey Instruments. New York and Geneva: UN, 2005.

List of Keywords

Date of Collection

Start End Cycle
2002-10 2004-01 Wave 1
2006-09 2007-06 Wave 2

Country

Netherlands  (NLD)

Geographic Coverage

Whole territory of the Netherlands.

Geographic Unit

Municipality (496 municipalities, using CBS (Statistics Netherlands) municipality coding of January 1st 2002).

Unit of Analysis

Individuals

Universe

WAVE 1
Individuals living within private households in the Netherlands, aged 18 to 79.

WAVE 2
Persons interviewed at Wave 1 who had agreed to be re-contacted.

Kind of Data

Survey data

Time Method

Panel

Data Collector

Sampling Procedure

WAVE 1 SAMPLING PROCEDURE  
1. Sampling frame
1.1 Type of frame: Address data obtained from Cendris, a daughter company of Dutch Mail (TPG Post). Address data based on three sources: a) the subscriber listing of Dutch Telecom; b) information on mail delivery points from Dutch mail; and c) information on removals from Dutch mail. (Information from delivery points is used to determine addresses that have never been listed with Dutch Telecom. Information on removals is used to determine addresses that no longer are listed with Dutch Telecom.) NB address sample instead of person sample.
1.2  Frame coverage: Whole population of the territory of the Netherlands; close to seven million private residences in the Netherlands available in the datafile maintained by Cendris.
1.3 Frame size: Random sample provided by Cendris: 40,000 private residences; 24,425 contacted; 21,869 eligible for participation. (Non-sample of 2,556, consisting of individuals under the age of 18 or over the age of 79, individuals who did not master the Dutch language, and addresses that were wrong, did not exist, were non-residential or were non-private residences).
1.4 Level of units available: Individuals (in households/private residences).

2. Sampling method
2.1 Sampling method type: Cendris drew a random sample of addresses from the Netherlands (N = 40,000). As a result of the random selection, the addresses were from all over the Netherlands and not restricted to specific regions or municipalities. The addresses were those of private residences: addresses of businesses, care-institutions, penitentiaries, homes of the elderly, and holiday homes were excluded from the sample frame.
2.2 Sampling stage definition
  - PSU: Private residences in the Netherlands.
  - SSU: NA.
  - TSU: NA.
2.3 Sampling stage size
  - PSU: 21,869.
  - SSU: NA.
  - TSU: NA.
2.4 Unit selection: All units from the random sample of addresses were selected.
2.5 Final stage unit selection: Simple Random Sampling.
2.6 Within Household unit selection: The first person to have a birthday after the first time the household was reached, was the one to be interviewed.
2.7 Stratification: NA.
2.8 Sample size
  - Starting size sample: 21,869.
  - Aimed total size at Wave 1: 8,500.
  - Aimed total size at Wave 3: 8,500 * 0.8 * 0.8 = 5,440.
2.9 Estimated Non-response
  - Initial non-response: 55.35% (12,104 / 21,869) (12,104 = 9,812 refusal, 1,998 not reached, 294 too ill).
  - Yearly attrition: 5-7%.
  - Non response measures: Oversampling; to reach the objective of 8,500 respondents, the sample size was 21,869.
  - Within household non-responses measures: None, the household was marked as non-response.
   
WAVE 2 SAMPLING PROCEDURE: same population than Wave 1 who had agreed to be re-contacted.

Mode of Data Collection

WAVE 1 MODE OF DATA COLLECTION
Method: Face-to-Face (personal interview) + Self-administered questionnaire.
Technique: Computer-Assisted (CAPI) and Paper and Pencil (PAPI), respectively.

WAVE 2 MODE OF DATA COLLECTION
Method: Interview questionnaire (CAPI / CATI / CAWI) + Self-completion questionnaire (PAPI / CAWI)
Technique:  
- PAPI: Paper and Pencil (self-completion questionnaire only)
- CAPI: 94.8%
- Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI): 3.3%
- Computer-Assisted Web Interviewing (CAWI): 2%  
Note that the CATI and CAWI options were offered only at a later stage of data collection, when sample members who had previously refused to participate or had not been reached were re-contacted.

Type of Research Instrument

Structured questionnaire in Dutch; self-administered questionnaire also translated in Turkish and Arabic.

Characteristics of Data Collection Situation

WAVE 1 DATA COLLECTION
1. Interviewers
1.1 Total number of interviewers: 160.
1.2 Number of interviewers in the field: 5 during pilot study, 160 during main study.
1.3 Network organization: Centralized.
1.4 Working arrangement of interviewers: Professional interviewers, many working free lance. Some worked full-time, others worked part-time.
1.5 Payment of interviewers: The interviewers were paid by interview. The income per interview included remuneration for the time it takes to contact respondents, travel to their home, and complete all the logistics of the interview. Interviewers received separate remuneration for attending training sessions (which was mandatory). In May 2003, a bonus scheme was introduced for interviewers. Under the scheme, interviewers who succeed in conducting five or more interviews a week received a financial bonus. Interviewers who managed to convince people who had initially refused to take part after all, also received a bonus. Interviewers' conversion efforts were restricted to sample members without a known telephone number.

2. Interviewer training:  
2.1 General interviewing: Yes, basic training in skills such as how to contact respondents, how to ask questions, and how to deal with problem situations.
2.2 Survey specific: Yes, during the NKPS/GGS-specific training, the interviewers received background information on the study, and were given instructions on topics specific to the NKPS, such as how to select Anchors, deal with multiple households, obtain Survey Alter addresses, classify occupations, and use the built-in postal code table. Part of the training involved practice with the CAPI questionnaire.
2.3 Length: General training: two days; NKPS/GGS-specific training: one day.
2.4 Control of performance: Yes. To monitor the quality of the interviewers' work, members of the fieldwork team listened to audio tapes of their interviews. Each interviewer was required to record the first three interviews on tape, as well as another ten percent during the remainder of the fieldwork (the computer prompted when this had to be done). In addition, a Response Analysis Survey (RAS) was carried out by telephone among ten percent of the addresses. Both respondents and non-respondents were presented with a short set of questions designed to assess selectivity in response. Finally, if a questionnaire had incomplete name and address information on an Anchor, the interviewer was requested to track down the missing information. In the case of Survey Alters, where possible, missing address details were tracked down by the fieldwork team with the aid of public sources of information (telephone directories, postal code table).
2.5 Interviewer survey: Yes. After each interview, the interviewer was asked to provide the following information: general atmosphere during interview, problems of understanding, assistance needed by answering, difficulties with answer categories, digressions in answering questions, interest in interview, suspicion about the research, honesty of answering, special conditions during the interview. Refresher sessions were organized during the course of the fieldwork, allowing the interviewers to address certain questions or problems they had encountered to the fieldwork coordinator. Finally, a self-completion questionnaire (designed by Joop Hox and Edith de Leeuw, experts in interviewer effects) was administered regarding their operating procedures and attitudes.

3. Contact protocols
3.1 Advance letter: Sample members received an informative and inviting introductory letter describing the purpose of the survey. The letter was personalized, if possible. A brochure was included with the introductory letter, providing information about the background to the survey, how the survey was being conducted, the importance of the respondents' participation, what the results would be used for, privacy protection, and the organization and individuals involved in the survey. Addressees were informed that the interviews had an average duration of 75 minutes. There was no mentioning of data collection among family members, because addressees might become apprehensive and decline participation. The panel nature of the study was also not emphasized, neither the inclusion of a self-completion questionnaire. The letter talked about families in a balanced way, to avoid running the risk that only people from closely-knit families would take part in the study; both positive and negative aspects of families were touched upon. Addressees were informed that they would receive €10,- if they participated in the interview. For additional information, addressees were referred to the NKPS website.
3.2 Cold contacts: All addressees were sent an introductory letter before the first contact attempt (no cold contacts in the sample). For those who had not been reached after the maximum number of contact attempts (ten phone calls or three home visits), a new attempt was made in May 2003. If a telephone number was available, a call center would re-contact the addressee, whereas interviewers re-contacted addresses without a telephone number.   
3.3 Scheduling / scattering: Yes. For addresses with telephone numbers, at least ten attempts at different times of day and on different days of the week were made. For addresses without telephone numbers, at least three attempts at different times of day and on different days of the week were made. The fieldwork bureau monitored the timing and number of contact attempts.
3.4 Contact history: Yes. For each contact attempt the interviewer had to record the time the attempt was made, how contact was made, and the result of the contact.
3.5 Min number of contacts: For addresses with telephone numbers, at least ten attempts were made. For addresses without telephone numbers, at least three attempts were made.
3.6 Max number of contacts: NA.

4. Questionnaire localization
4.1 Validation: NA.
4.2 Pre-test: A pilot was carried out in April 2002 (55 respondents), discovering some glitches in question routing. Furthermore, interviewers reported the need for introductory sentences, elaborations.
4.3 Length of interview and additional information about the data collection situation: Average length of interview: 74 minutes. Ideally, the interview was to be conducted with no other persons present. If this situation was not possible (e.g. the presence of young children), interviewers reported the presence of others (by filling in a pre-structured questionnaire on the interview situation). They reported who was present (e.g. partner, son/daughter), whether the other was present during part or during the entire interview. Sensitive questions (e.g. attitudes, feelings of loneliness) were addressed via the self-completion questionnaire. During the course of fieldwork, it became apparent that people under the age of 30 were under-represented. Starting in September 2003, call center employees and interviewers who contacted addresses specifically requested to speak to someone over the age of 18 and under the age of 30.


WAVE 2 DATA COLLECTION
1. Interviewers
1.1.  Total number of interviewers: 153
1.2. Number of interviewers in the field: 150. During the fieldwork, three interviewers left; two chose to do so, and one was requested to leave by GfK PS. Another 17 interviewers were trained in telephone interviewing. One left on own request.
1.3. Network organization: DK
1.4. Working arrangement of interviewers: DK
1.5. Payment of interviewers: DK

2. Interviewer training:  
2.1 General interviewing: Organized by GfK PS, Dufec, and the NIDI Fieldwork Centre.  
Top priorities: (1) achieving a high and non-selective response, (2) obtaining survey Alter addresses, (3) receiving Anchor's permission to be contacted for participation in possible third wave, (4) receiving Anchor's permission to link survey to registry data.
General interview training included basic training in skills such as how to contact respondents, how to minimize non-response. In addition to the training sessions organized at the start of the fieldwork, refresher days were organized for the interviewers. During these sessions, additional instructions were given and there were opportunities to ask questions and exchange experiences. Furthermore, sound recordings of interviews were played in order to address specific quality aspects of interviewing.  
2.2 Survey specific: Background information about the NKPS and the rational underlying the interview questionnaire was provided. Also, a special session was devoted to practicing the routines in the interview questionnaire, including the built-in tools (i.e. postal code table, and occupational classification table).
2.3 Length: 10 days with 2 half-day sessions, 2 days for telephone interviewers, refresher days
2.4 Control of performance:  
(1) Interviewers were monitored on the basis of initial contact, response rates, and recording of the interviews (if permitted by the respondent).
(2) 1500 control questionnaires were sent to anchors to reveal potential cases of fraud.  
(3) Checks were carried out by NIDI fieldwork centre were municipality's and interviewers' address information differed.  
(4) Progress was monitored at distance through an information processing package.  
2.5 Interviewer survey: Yes, The interviewer evaluated the course of each interview after it had been completed. Questions were answered concerning the setting of the interview, such as the presence of others and the general atmosphere. The Anchor’s performance was also rated, using the evaluation form of the interview questionnaire.  

3. Contact protocols
3.1 Advance letter: Personalized introductory letter and a brochure were sent to the respondent two days before the Anchor was contacted. The letter informed about the toll-free telephone number of the NKPS Helpdesk and the NKPS e-mail address.
Furthermore, addressees were informed about the duration of the interview (about one hour) and that they would receive €10,- if they participated in the interview. They were also told that after all interviews had been conducted, three travel vouchers among all participants (1 x € 500 and 2 x € 250) were to be put up for raffle. For additional information, addressees were referred to the NKPS website and to the brochure.
3.2 Cold contacts: All addressees were sent an introductory letter before the first contact attempt (no cold contacts in the sample). For those who had not been reached or who has refused to participate after the maximum number of contact attempts (ten phone calls or three home visits), a new attempt was made. If also this re-contacting attempt failed, alternative survey methods were offered: CATI and CAWI. Respondents willing to participate via CATI were contacted by the call center for the completion of the questionnaire.  
Respondents willing to participate via CAWI were sent a letter stating the website address and their personal access code. Respondents who subsequently failed to complete the questionnaire were sent a letter of reminder.
3.3 Scheduling / scattering: Yes.  
Phase 1: All participants were asked to participate in the CAPI questionnaire through introductory letter, followed by a phone call.
Phase 2: Soft refusals: Same procedure as in phase 1 but with different interviewer. Hard refusals: Contacted for CATI questionnaire.
Phase 3: CATI and CAWI questionnaires were offered.
3.4 Contact history: Yes. For each contact attempt the interviewer had to record the time the attempt was made, how contact was made, and the result of the contact.
3.5 Min number of contacts: 10 initial contact by telephone, 3 home visits
3.6 Max number of contacts: NA.

4. Questionnaire localization
4.1. Validation: A pilot was carried out in the months from May until July 2006 (200 respondents). The purpose of the pilot was to test the different data collection methods and to follow all related procedures.
4.2. Pre-test: YES.
  - 141 Dutch respondents (CAPI, CATI, CAWI)
  - 35 Dutch-speaking migrants (CAPI)
  - 24 non-Dutch speaking migrants (CAPI)
4.3 Length of interview and additional information about the data collection situation: Average duration: 60.1 minutes (60.1 minutes via CAPI, 63.2 via CATI, 51.6 via CAWI). To ensure that the questionnaires for CAPI and CATI were identical (apart from a few textual adjustments) the telephone team also conducted the interview with the aid of CAPI laptops. Apart from textual differences linked to the method of data collection, the content of the CAWI questionnaire differs slightly from that of the CAPI/CATI questionnaire, namely: differences in the questions (e.g., different routing for questions on income), and differences resulting from procedural differences (e.g., the CAWI questionnaire does not include built-in controls).

Actions to Minimize Losses

WAVE 1 ACTIONS
1.  Dealing with nonresponse
1.1 Screening: Yes. Checks were carried out on the correctness of address information. If necessary, a special unit of interviewers personally visited addresses to find out who lived there.
1.2 Refusal conversion: Interviewers who managed to convince people who had initially refused, to take part after all, received a bonus. The initial plan was to re-contact soft-refusers only. However, given that only a small proportion of the refusals were categorized as soft (around four percent), the entire group of refusers, both soft and hard, were re-contacted. Addressees with a telephone number were re-contacted by a call center, whereas expert interviewers re-contacted addressees without a telephone number. Starting in May 2003 travel cheques were raffled as an additional incentive. In addition, an additional incentive of €15 was offered to initial refusers.
1.3 Incentives: Yes. At the start of the field work, respondents were given a gift voucher worth €10,- at the end of the interview, irrespective of whether they would complete the self-completion questionnaire. Starting in May 2003, travel cheques were raffled as an additional incentive. Potential respondents were informed about this in the introductory letter. Another additional incentive which was introduced in May 2003, was to offer potential respondents who were not willing to participate on the basis of a €10,- incentive, €15,- extra (so they would receive €25,- in total). The extra €15,- was not a particularly effective incentive. Less than one percent of sample member were converted.

2. Tracking of sampled units
2.1 Respondent contact information: Yes, respondent's address and telephone number (home, mobile, work) were collected. The respondent was not explicitly asked to provide an e-mail address.
2.2 Other contact information: Yes, contact details (address and telephone number [home, mobile, work]) of a proxy (such as parents, friend) were collected. The person was not explicitly asked to provide an e-mail address.
2.3 Cards: A "thank-you-letter", "change-of-address-notification" card (with paid postage fee, included in all the mailings as a standard part of the letter), and birthday/holiday cards were sent to all the respondents (planned frequency of contacts with the respondents between the two waves: at least annually). Furthermore, an on-line form for notification of change of contact details were set up, a brochure with results of Wave 1 was sent, and there were personal contacts such as telephone calls or visits.
2.4 Additional surveys: Yes, 12 mini-panels; qualitative interviews. For an overview of the topics see http://www.nkps.nl/NKPSEN/MiniPanels.htm
2.5 Administrative records: Yes. Respondents were encouraged to report a residential relocation. Change-of-address cards were included in mailings, and respondents were also informed about the option of entering new address information in a form constructed for that purpose on the NKPS-website. Checks were also carried out with the help of municipal population registers.

WAVE 2 ACTIONS
1.  Dealing with nonresponse
1.1 Screening: Yes. In the period between the first and second wave, respondents were encouraged to report a residential relocation (see above documentation about Wave 1 "2.5 Administrative records"). In preparation of Wave 2 fieldwork all addresses, all addresses were validated by Cendris, a daughter company of Dutch Mail (TPG Post) that holds a database of more than 7.3 million private households in the Netherlands. During the course of fieldwork, additional efforts were made to track down the correct address via Cendris.
1.2 Refusal conversion: Three re-contacting phases were carried out. After failure of first attempts, 'soft' refusals were approached by a different interviewer in the re-contacting phase-after a slightly different introductory letter had been sent; 'hard' refusals were phoned by specially trained CATI interviewers. The third phase concerned proposal of alternative methods. Additional incentives were offered to refusers (The average value of the incentives given to all respondents in the re-contacting phase was 20 Euros).
1.3 Incentives: Anchors who agreed to take part after the first contacting phase were given 10 Euros (option of a giftcard or donating). In the re-contacting phase respondents were offered on average 20 Euros. Respondents were offered additional incentives if they did not return the self-completion questionnaire in time.  

2. Tracking of sampled units
2.1. Respondent contact information: Between wave 1 and 2 respondents were encouraged to report address changes. Before the start of wave 2, all addresses were validated by Cendris through their database of 7.3 million private households in the Netherlands.  
2.2. Other contact information: DK
2.3. Cards: Interviewers filled in contact forms for up to ten initial visits to each address, which was afterwards entered into the CAPI laptop. The interviewers had access to respondents' contact information with each new phase of contacting the respondents.  
2.4. Additional surveys: Yes, 12 mini-panels; qualitative interviews. For an overview of the topics see http://www.nkps.nl/NKPSEN/MiniPanels.htm.
2.5. Administrative records: Yes. Respondents were encouraged to report a residential relocation. Change-of-address cards were included in mailings, and respondents were also informed about the option of entering new address information in a form constructed for that purpose on the NKPS-website. Checks were also carried out with the help of municipal population registers. 93% of the respondents accepted to link questionnaire information to registry data.

Control operations

Controls (consistency checking) were done automatically during the interview thanks to the CAPI / CATI / CAWI questionnaire.

Weighting

WAVE 1 WEIGHTING
Two weight factors were created. The first (aweight_1801) takes into account that a random sample of households was taken rather than a random sample of individuals. The second (aweight_1802) makes the main sample respondents representative of the non-institutionalized population aged 18-79. (If unweighted, men, the younger age categories, young adults living with their parents, individuals living in highly urban or highly rural areas, and/or living in the West of the Netherlands, are under-represented.) If one wants to adjust the sample to an individual sample AND one wants to adjust the sample distribution of household type, sex, age, region, and urbanization, to population figures, use the variable aweight1.

WAVE 2 WEIGHTING
Three weighting variables were constructed. The first, bweight_1801, takes into account that, at Wave 1, a random sample of households was taken rather than a random sample of individuals. This weight is calculated by first taking the percentages of respondents living in each household size at Wave 1 when aweight_1801 is being used, and dividing them by the percentages of respondents in each household size at Wave 1 who participated in Wave 2 (with aweight_1801 not being used).  
The second, bweight_1802, replicates aweight_1802 from Wave 1 and thus makes the Anchor Main sample representative of the non-institutionalized population aged 18-79 at the time Wave 1 was held (i.e., in 2003). bweight_1802 does not make the sample representative of the population at the time Wave 2 was held (i.e., in 2007).  
The third, bweight_1803, is new to the second wave and, like bweight_1802, makes the Anchor Main sample representative of the non-institutionalized population aged 18-79 at the time Wave 1 was held. In addition, bweight_1803 also adjusts the sample for selective non-response on church membership, level of education, and employment status.

Cleaning Operations

WAVE 1 CLEANING OPERATIONS
Consistency checks and range checks were carried out for both the CAPI and the self-completion questionnaires. If errors or anomalies were detected, the data were corrected only if it was known for certain that a mistake had been made (certainty came from listening to audio tapes of interviews).  Anomalies and errors are reported as 'known problems' in the NKPS codebook if no objective basis for correcting them existed. Before the final release, the data were anonymized.

WAVE 2 CLEANING OPERATIONS: DK

Response Rate

WAVE 1
Response rate - Final disposition codes:
I = complete interview: 9,765 (1,651 abbreviated version, 8,161 full-length)
P = partial interview: 9 (for an operational definition of partial response, see the July 2005 codebook, p. 69
NE = non-eligible : 2,556 (consisting of individuals under the age of 18 or over the age of 79, individuals who did not master the Dutch language, and addresses that were wrong, did not exist, were non-residential or were non-private residences)
NC = non-contact: 1,998
R = refusal: 9,812
O = other non-response: 294 (unable to participate due to health restrictions [too ill, dementia, mental incapacity])
UC = unknown eligibility, contacted: NA
UC = unknown eligibility, non-contact: NA
eC = estimated proportion of contacted cases of unknown eligibility that are eligible: NA
eN = estimated proportion of non-contacted cases of unknown eligibility that are eligible: NA

WAVE 2
Response rate - Final disposition codes:
I = complete interview: 6091
  CAPI: 94.8%
  CATI: 3.3%
  CAWI: 2.0%
P = partial interview: DK
NE = non-eligible : 6% = 133 respondents who deceaced or who left the Netherlands
NC = non-contact: 9% = 496 respondents who were not reached
R = refusal: 12% = 929 respondents
O = other non-response: 59 respondents who were too ill   
UC = unknown eligibility, contacted: DK
UC = unknown eligibility, non-contact: DK
eC = estimated proportion of contacted cases of unknown eligibility that are eligible: DK
eN = estimated proportion of non-contacted cases of unknown eligibility that are eligible: DK

Completeness of Study Stored

Data on number of contacts needed and call-backs are not publicly available.

Restrictions

In order to access micro data files, users have to sign and submit a Statement of affiliation, confidentiality and acceptable usage. They also have to submit a title and abstract of their research project. They can use the data for all their research projects, except for datasets from Australia and Norway. Users of these datasets need to submit a new application form if they want to use the data in a different research project. The access rights from Wave 1 data are transferred to the Wave 2 data.

Access Authority

Name Affiliation E-mail address Universal Resource Identifier
UNECE Population Unit - Palais des Nations - CH-1211 Geneva 10 - Switzerland. Tel: +41 22 917 24 77 - fax: +41 22 917 01 07 ggp@unece.org http://www.unece.org/pau/

Citation Requirement

In any work emanating from research based on the Generations and Gender Survey micro-data, I will acknowledge that these data were obtained from the GGP Data Archive and refer to the publication that describes the model survey instruments: United Nations 2005. Generations & Gender Programme: SurveyInstruments. New York and Geneva: UN, 2005

Deposit Requirement

Users of GGS micro-data are required to send any research papers based on the Generations and Gender Survey micro-data or aggregate tabulations to the Population Activities Unit of the UN Economic Commission for Europe, for inclusion in the GGP publications archive.

Conditions

In order to access, it is necessary to subscribe to the GGP Data User Space, and to follow the instructions available on the GGP data access webpage.

Disclaimer

The authors and producers bear no responsibility for the uses of the GGS data, or for interpretations or inferences based on these uses. The producers accept no liability for indirect, consequential or incidental damages or losses arising from use of the data collection, or from the unavailability of, or break in access to the service for whatever reason.

Notes

Metadata on Wave 2 survey methodology will be refined in forthcoming weeks. Provided information was retrieved from Wave 2 codebook of the NKPS.

Related Materials

Website of the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study

Netherlands_Main questionnaire_W1_en

Netherlands_Main questionnaire_W1_nl

Netherlands_Self-completion questionnaire _W1_en

Netherlands_Self-completion questionnaire _W1_nl

Netherlands_Self-completion substitute questionnaire _W1_en

Netherlands_Self-completion substitute questionnaire _W1_nl

Netherlands_Main questionnaire_W2_en

Netherlands_Main questionnaire_W2_nl

Netherlands_Self-completion_W2_en

Netherlands_Self-completion_W2_nl

Other References Note

Dutch country presentations at the GGP International Working Group Meetings

Codebook of the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study. Wave 1. Version 1, July 2005

Codebook of the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study. Wave 2. Version 2, April 2012

Data Files Description

File Name

GGS_Wave1_Netherlands_V.4.3..NSDstat

Contents of Files

GGS Wave 1

VARIABLES HAVING ALL SYSTEM MISSING CASES ARE DROPPED BEFORE PUBLICATION IN NESSTAR.
This is the reason why the total no. of variables in the Nesstar data file is smaller than the total number of variables in the SPSS and STATA files.

Variables are ordered according to the sections of the GGS codebook: Household, Children, Partnerships, Household Organisation and Partnership Quality, Parents and Parental Home, Fertility, Health and Well-Being, Respondent's Activity and Income, Partner's Activity and Income, Household Possessions, Income and Transfers, Value Orientations and Attitudes, Interviewers' report.
The variables begin with a letter designating the wave of data collection ("a" for the first wave likewise "b" for the second wave). We have attempted to keep the names of variables the same across the waves, and all the new variables would be identified as follows ["wave letter"]n e.g.  bn301.  
Although we encourage the countries to strictly follow the GGS Questionnaire, countries might implement a question that differs to a considerable extent from the GGS Questionnaire. In this case either we add country specific response values, or we introduce a country specific variable.  
Country specific values are added when the question follows the model questionnaire, but the answers are not at all or partly compatible. They are at least 4 digits long (F4 format) and begin with the country code: e.g., Australia 2401. Hence, the country code, as an example, for Australia is 24.  
A country specific variable is introduced when the question differs from the model questionnaire albeit measuring the same concept. This kind of variables is identified with a suffix given by the country code plus a number, e.g., Australia a119_2401.
In order to have an overview of GGS country code, please refer to the variable "acountry".

File Structure

Record Group

Overall Case Count

8161

Overall Variable Count

597

Type of File

Nesstar 200801

Extent of Processing Checks

WAVE 1 DATA HARMONISATION
The data is submitted in an already pre-harmonised form. It is prepared and organised according to the GGS standards.  
Harmonisation aims at achieving a clear and comparable format of the GGS micro-data files that would be adequate for cross-country comparison.  The harmonisation procedure basically is composed of:
1. Label checks  
This step makes sure that all the variables are named the same across the countries and refer to a particular question in the GGS Questionnaire. Also the value labels are checked. They should be the same across GGS datasets.  
2. Dealing with grids
The GGS Questionnaire holds several grids of either event history information or members of the household. Such data needs to be harmonized with specific attention to order and logical consistency of grid-rows (be either household members or events such as births). In data sense each row of the grid is represented by variable name followed by a subscripted number ("_#"). Each subscript thus represents one household member or one event. Part of the grid harmonization is grid sorting. Grid rows are sorted according to pre-defined key. For example in the household grid, the household members are sorted according to their relationship to the respondent i.e. the relation to respondent variable (ahg3_# or bhg3_# ). Respondents would appear, first, followed by their partners and children if any and then followed by other household members. As there may be more then one child (or other relative) living in the household they also would need to be sorted. In the case of the household grid, age is used as the secondary sorting key (starting with the oldest person to the youngest).
3. Routing
Routing check ensures that the structure of underlying data set matches the structure of the GGS questionnaire. Its main goal is to code any given variable in the dataset to either a valid response, nonresponse or skip as indicated in the questionnaire. Consequently, the indicated skip in the quetionnaire is represented with a system missing code (. in STATA, sysmis in SPSS), while the missing information for other reasons is coded into non-applicable/no response (i.e. codes 7, 8, 9 in SPSS or .a, .b, .c in STATA).  
4. Consolidation  
The process consolidates the information scattered over several variables into a single one. The consolidation procedure is carried out in the Children Section, the Partnership Section and the Parents and Parental Home Section.
5. Imputation  
Due to its sensitive nature, the respondents are reluctant to share income information with the interviewer. In order to be able to use income information in a cross country comparative study and not to loose too many observations in the process it is necessary to impute the approximately correct distribution of the income variable in each country.  
6. Calculation of derived variables
We calculate derived variables out of the following variables:
- grid variables (i.e., household grid, children grid, and partnership history grid); the codebook starts with the constructed variables that sum the key socio-demographic characteristics of the respondent.
- month and year variables,  
- hours and minutes variables,
- frequency and unit variables.  
Occupation variables are recoded into ISCO-88 1 digit.
Explanations of the ways in which consolidated and derived variables are obtained, are available under the field "Note" of the "Variable Description" sections.
For a more detailed and technical procedure please refer to the Data Cleaning and Harmonisation Guidelines.

Missing Data

The following missing values have been assigned:
- 6, 96, 996, etc. = Unknown (only for consolidated variables in the group "administrative variables")
- 7, 97, 997, etc. = Don't know
- 8, 98, 998, etc. = Refusal
- 9, 99, 999, etc. = Not-applicable/no response

Version

Harmonized dataset, GGS Wave1, version 4.3.

Notes

IMPROVEMENTS INTRODUCED WITH V.4.3. (August 2016):
Variables corrected with Version 4.3.
- fertintent (no more ambiguous labelling)
- a1101 (corrected error in coding)
- aweight (now available also for NLD CZE SWE POL)
- aregion (now available also for HUN)
- aplace (now available also for HUN)
- a5112 (corrected routing error for ROU)
- a5113 (corrected routing error for ROU)
- a5114 (corrected routing error for ROU)
- a5115 (corrected routing error i for ROU)
- a211b_ (corrected error for POL & GEO)
- ankids (corrected error for POL & GEO)
- a1008mnth (corrected error for NGR & BEL)
- a108 (now available for SWE)
- a109_1 (now available for SWE)
- a109_2 (now available for SWE)
- a149 (now available for SWE)
- a309 (now available for SWE)
- aregion (now available for SWE)
- a620_ (corrected error for DEU & CZE)
- a402 (corrected error for POL)
- a149 (corrected error routing error in NOR)
- a344 (corrected error routing error in NOR)
- a256_ (corrected error for POL & GEO)

IMPROVEMENTS INTRODUCED WITH V.4.2. (February 2014):
The update from v4.1 to v4.2 does not include corrections of existing variables.  
The update only includes additional variables which are derived from the pre-existing datasets
- Variables derived from grid variables and variables which concern the respondents and his/her partner: numdissol numdivorce nummarriage numpartners livingwithpartner childprevp femage maleage femeduc maleeduc fertintent numbiol numres numnonres numstep numallchild ageyoungest ageoldest numrespleave numotherparentleave coreschild coresparen coresgrandp coressibl.
- Variables derived from month and year variable:  
a808Dur a822Dur a907Dur a911Dur a914Dur; a303cAgeP a315AgeP a316cAgeP a374cAgeP a608AgeP a610AgeP a617bAgeP a621AgeP a914AgeP a941AgeP; a107AgeR a121AgeR a150AgeR a239aAgeR a239bAgeR a240AgeR a301AgeR a302bAgeR; a311AgeR a314bAgeR a314dAgeR a371AgeR a372bAgeR a603AgeR a608AgeR a610AgeR a613AgeR a614AgeR a619AgeR a621AgeR a816AgeR a822AgeR a871AgeR a5116AgeR a5117bAgeR; a302bTdiff a314bTdiff a314dTdiff a372bTdiff.
- Variables derived from hours and minutes variables: a324_hour a520_hour a540_hour.
- Variables derived from frequency and unit variables: a205mnth,a241mnth,a325mnth,a355mnth,a359mnth,a363mnth,a367mnth,a521mnth,a541mnth,a1008mnth,a1102mnth; a203c_?w a204c_?w.
- Occupation variables recoded into ISCO-88 1 digit: a828_1dig a832_1dig a861_1dig a917_1dig a921_1dig a933_1dig a5112_1dig a5114_1dig.

IMPROVEMENTS INTRODUCED WITH V.4.1. (April 2012):
- Variables corrected: amarstat, ankids, a357, a365, a5106a_b, a5106a_s
- Value labels defined: a832
- Correction in the documentation: a513a, a533a, atype, a1102u (now documented as available)

IMPROVEMENTS INTRODUCED WITH V.4.0 (March 2012):
- New constructed variables: asex, aage, abyear, aeduc, aactstat, aparstat, amarstat, anpartner, ankids, ahhsize, ahhtype
- New consolidated variables on respondents' current activity: a870, a871y, a873, a875
- New consolidated variables on respondents' partners current activity: a940  
- Variables previously unavailable, now available: aregion, atype, a110, a123, a602, a622, a626, a513a, a513b, a533a, a533b, a835, a923, aweight_1801(correcting for design effects) & aweight_1802 (correcting for design effects & underrepresentation of certain groups)
- Variables corrected: a122, a238, a239ay, a239by, a383(now rounded)
- Changes in the variable/value labels: a203b* (family members were previously included; now two institutional childcare alternatives available)

IMPROVEMENTS INTRODUCED WITH V.3.0 (August 2010):
- New consolidated variables: a370, a383, a384
- Changes in the variable/value labels: a148, a308, a321, a5113, a5115, a379 (proportion of ISCED 5,6, i.e., high educated respondents was very low. Recode of category ISCED 4 into ISCED 5).
- Variables corrected: a1003 (they were coded as first, second, third... mentionned; now are coded per item as a yes/no question).
- Variables with no country-specificities anymore: a122 (no CS variable anymore, but a CS value, i.e., "1801 - does not own the dwelling".

FIRST DATASET RELEASED IN NESSTAR V.1.3. (March 2010).

IMPROVEMENTS INTRODUCED WITH V.1.3.compared to V.1.2. (January 2010):
- Variables corrected: a230y_7, a233y_*, a550.
- Changes in the variable/value labels: for all variables added the labels for values 7,8,9; aplace, a224_*(now with labels); a122_1901 (missing values now defined); a5112, a5114, a828, a832 (some labels are not ISCO, but country specific).
- Variables dropped because not asked in the Dutch GGS: a255m_*, a257_*, a258_*.

File Name

GGS_Wave2_Netherlands_V.1.3..NSDstat

Contents of Files

GGS Wave 2

VARIABLES HAVING ALL SYSTEM MISSING CASES ARE DROPPED BEFORE PUBLICATION IN NESSTAR.
This is the reason why the total no. of variables in the Nesstar data file is smaller than the total number of variables in the SPSS and STATA files.

Variables are ordered according to the sections of the GGS codebook: Household, Children, Partnerships, Household Organisation and Partnership Quality, Parents and Parental Home, Fertility, Health and Well-Being, Respondent's Activity and Income, Partner's Activity and Income, Household Possessions, Income and Transfers, Value Orientations and Attitudes, Interviewers' report.
The variables begin with a letter designating the wave of data collection ("a" for the first wave likewise "b" for the second wave). We have attempted to keep the names of variables the same across the waves, and all the new variables would be identified as follows ["wave letter"]n e.g.  bn301.  
Although we encourage the countries to strictly follow the GGS Questionnaire, countries might implement a question that differs to a considerable extent from the GGS Questionnaire. In this case either we add country specific response values, or we introduce a country specific variable.  
Country specific values are added when the question follows the model questionnaire, but the answers are not at all or partly compatible. They are at least 4 digits long (F4 format) and begin with the country code: e.g., Australia 2401. Hence, the country code, as an example, for Australia is 24.  
A country specific variable is introduced when the question differs from the model questionnaire albeit measuring the same concept. This kind of variables is identified with a suffix given by the country code plus a number, e.g., Australia a119_2401.
In order to have an overview of GGS country code, please refer to the variable "acountry".

File Structure

Record Group

Overall Case Count

6090

Overall Variable Count

850

Type of File

Nesstar 200801

Extent of Processing Checks

WAVE 2 DATA HARMONISATION: see "Extent of Processing Checks" "WAVE 1 DATA HARMONISATION".

Missing Data

The following missing values have been assigned:
- 6, 96, 996, etc. = Unknown (only for consolidated variables in the group "administrative variables")
- 7, 97, 997, etc. = Don't know
- 8, 98, 998, etc. = Refusal
- 9, 99, 999, etc. = Not-applicable/no response
For further information, see the GGS Wave 1 questionnaire manual: http://www.ggp-i.org/materials/survey-instruments.html.

Version

Harmonized dataset, GGS Wave2, version 1.3.

Notes

IMPROVEMENTS INTRODUCED WITH GGS_Wave2_V.1.3 (August 2016)
Correction of the following variables that were previously  erronous: b343_*, bnnumdissol, bnumdissol, bnnumdivorce, bnumdivorce, bnnummarriage, bnummarriage.

IMPROVEMENTS INTRODUCED WITH GGS_Wave2_V.1.2 (April 2015)
The update from v1.1 to v1.2 does not include corrections of existing variables. The update only includes additional variables which are derived from the pre-existing datasets.  

- Variables derived from grid variables and variables which concern the respondents and his/her partner: bnumdissol, bnnumdissol, bnumdivorce, bnnumdivorce, bnnummarriage, bnummarriage, bnumpartnerships, bnnumpartnerships, bnrespartafterw1, blivingwithpartner, bchildprevp, bnchildprevp, bfemage, bmaleage, bfemeduc , , bmaleeduc, bfertintent, bnumbiol, bnumnonres, bnumres, bnumstep, bnumallchild, bageoldest, bageyoungest, bcoreschild, bcoresgrandp, bcoresparen, bcoressibl , bhhtype.
- Variables derived from month and year variable: b121AgeR, b150AgeR , bn152AgeR, b239aAgeR, b239bAgeR, b240AgeR, bn304Agb303cAgeP, b311AgeR, b315AgeP, b316cAgeP, b371AgeR, b372bAgeR, b372bTdiff, b374cAgeP, b5116AgeR, b5117bAgeR, b603AgeR, b608AgeP, b608AgeR, b610AgeP, b610AgeR, b621AgeP, b621AgeR, b871AgeR, b907Dur, b911Dur, b914AgeP, b914Dur, b941AgeP.
- Variables derived from hours and minutes variables: b324hour, b520hour, b540hour, b221hour_x.
- Variables derived from frequency and unit variables: b203c_xw, b204c_xw, b205mnth, b241mnth, b325mnth, b521mnth, b1008mnth.
- Occupation variables recoded into ISCO-88 1 digit: b828_1dig, b832_1dig, b861_1dig, b917_1dig, b921_1dig, b933_1dig.
- Three groups of variables derived from section no. 8 "Activity and Education History": 1) variables counting the total number of different activity and education situations Rs has had since age 16 (i.e., bnnumworkstatuses, bnnumstudentstatuses, bnnumemplstatuses, bnnumselfemplstatuses, bnnumhelpfamstatuses, bnnumunemplstatuses, bnnumretiredstatuses, bnnummilitarystatuses, bnnumhomestatuses, bnnummatleavestatuses, bnnumparleavestatuses, bnnumdisabilitystatuses, bnnumotherstatuses, bnnum1401, bnnum1501, bnnum1801, bnnum1301, bnnumparttime, bnnumfulltime, bnnumboth, bnnumparttime_1801, bnnumparttime_1802, bnnumpartfulltime_1803, bnnumfulltime_1804, 2) the total duration in month of each of the different situation (i.e., bndurstudentstatuses, bnduremplstatuses, bndurselfemplstatuses, bndurhelpfamstatuses, bndurunemplstatuses, bndurretiredstatuses, bndurmilitarystatuses, bndurhomestatuses, bndurmatleavestatuses, bndurparleavestatuses, bndurilldisabledstatuses, bndurotherstatusstatuses, bndur1501, bndur1401, bndur1301, bndurparttime, bndurlastparttime, bndurstudwhilework), 3) the age of R at the beginning and end of part-time employments (i.e., bn876_xAgeR, bn877_xAgeR, bn878xAgeR, bn879_xAgeR).

The availability of these variables in each different country-specific file depends on the availability of variables used for their calculation.

IMPROVEMENTS INTRODUCED WITH V.1.2. in Nesstar GGS micro data files (April 2015):
Publication of variables that were previously deleted before dataset release in Nesstar. The following variables are concerned: grid variables, month and year variables, hours and minutes variables, frequency and unit variables, and occupation variables.

IMPROVEMENTS INTRODUCED WITH V.1.1. (March 2013):
- Variables corrected: b325u, b383, b521u, b541u; b1014* and b1018* (errors in format variable corrected)
- Changes in the variable/value labels: b303b (value 1801 recoded into 999 "other"); b865*, b866*, b937*, b938* (wrong values for user missing now corrected)  
- Variables dropped because all system missing: b325, b943, b945.
IMPROVEMENTS INTRODUCED WITH V.1.1. in the derived variables calculated for Nesstar GGS micro data files (March 2013):
- Variables corrected: b203c_*w and b204c_*w (previously frequencies greater than 7 were put equal to system missing, now they are put as equal to seven).
- Variables previously dropped and now available: bint_st and bint_pr.

FIRST DATASET RELEASED: V. 1.0. (November 2012).

Notes

WAVE 2 DATASETS - Main differences compared to WAVE 1 datasets
Wave 2 datasets include an additional new section that had not been implemented in the Wave 1 data collection. It is the section no. 8 "Activity and Education History". Respondents report comprehensively on their activity and education history since age 16. Two additional sections are also present at the end of wave 2 dataset: "Interviewer observations" and "Interviewer report" (respectively sections no. 13 and 14).
A set of constructed variables at the top of the data file increase the usability of the GGS data by summarizing key socio-demographic characteristics of the respondent (age, birth year, sex, level of educational attainment, activity status, partnership status, number of co-resident partners, number of children, household size, household type). An additional set of variables consolidates information on the current activity of the respondent and his/her partner that is otherwise spread over the questionnaire. Another set of consolidated variables concern respondents' parents and parental home.

WAVE 2 DATASETS - Variables names
Variables in the Wave 2 data sets that are consistent with variables implemented in the Wave 1 questionnaire are named identically. Wave 2 variable names start with the letter "b" compared to letter "a" in Wave 1. Variables that have not been implemented in Wave 1 but collected in Wave 2 begin with "bn".  
In Wave 2 datasets published in Nesstar, the variable "brid - R identification number" has been renamed into "arid" (same variable name than Wave 2). This allows the user to merge Wave 1 and Wave 2 datasets in Nesstar.
In Wave 2 datasets published in Nesstar, variable labels have the indication "(W2)". This allows the user to distinguish Wave 2 variables from Wave 1 variables, on the basis of the variable labels.

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